Seeing the Big Picture – Visualization

acceleration.nate

As athletes are recovering from an injury, visualizing movement (mental imagery) has been shown to be beneficial in maintaining skills, decreasing stress, increasing self confidence, and increasing motivation to train to return to their sport (Research Quarterly for Exercise & Sport, Vol. 78, Sept. 2007, Pg 351-363). There have also been studies that show how

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Strengthen Your Landing to Improve Your Vertical

bbsquatposition

Before every jump an athlete performs, there is a quick lowering (eccentric) motion followed by a transition from lowering to rising (amortization phase). Several recent studies have suggested (and our observations over the past 15 years suggest the same), that increasing ones ability to overcome the eccentric and transition phase more rapidly can improve the

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The Light vs. Heavy Weight Strength Debate…

Mo Squat

A recent study in the published in the Journal of Applied Physiology raised the idea that lifting light loads (30% of 1RM) to failure can be just as beneficial to strength development as lifting heavy loads to failure. At AthleteFIT we have seen very similar results over the last decade with our younger or less

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ACL Series: Return to Confidence (Post Surgery)

TuckJumpLanding2

Even with the best programming for risk reduction, ACL injuries still happen. And when they do, it is the responsibility of the therapist or performance coach to rebuild the athlete’s confidence as well as their strength. Quite often, there is a lack of confidence or the physiological factor that contributes to the athlete’s ability to

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ACL Series: Programming Phases to Reduce Risk

TuckJumpLanding2

Programming for Risk Reduction and Improved Performance:   There are many programs out there that have been shown to reduce the risk of injury when used in the pre-season. But… “Results suggest that training duration may be an important factor to consider when designing injury prevention programs that facilitate long-term changes in movement control (Padua,

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ACL Series: Risk Factors

TuckJumpLanding2

Over the past few years much of the research, including a recent review (Bien, 2011) named the several biomechanical/neuromuscular risk factors for non-contact ACL injury, as well as the most effective programming implementations for prevention. Here are the area’s we focus on in our program model: Hip and Knee Pathomechanics Hamstring Activation and Strength Deficits

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ACL Series: From Rehab to Risk Reduction

TuckJumpLanding2

Annually in the US alone there are over 80,000 ACL tears occurring primarily in athletes 15-25 years of age that participate in sports that require aggressive pivot based movements (Griffin, 2000). In the past 12 years we have had over 3000 female athletes come through our program, and in that time we have seen 11

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Focus Exercise: Weighted Jump Squats

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In this post we are comparing the weighted jump squat to unweighted jump squats (counter movement jump), and commenting on which weighted version might be more similar in pattern to the unweighted jumps. When working with younger athletes in a developmental stage, we need to continue to focus on the movement of the exercise and

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FOCUS EXERCISE: Why do we do single legged exercises?

Kkline.Mjones

Two of the most discussed aspects associated with injury risk reduction during the season are: 1) lower limb symmetry and 2) force absorption qualities. We used a Hop and Stop test of bilateral force production / force absorption, and the results showed a tremendous gain in symmetry in both the hopping and leaping exercises. We

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